Fictional Character Case Study – Rick Sanchez (Rick and Morty) Part I

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‘Tis the season of gifting and love, but it’s also a season of TV shows pausing their airings. Some of you might have noticed that I mention some famous TV characters here and there, but in case you didn’t know, I’m very big on watching high-quality TV shows and I often delve into characters and the way they are presented to us.

Now that How to Get Away With Murder is making a pause (by the way, have you seen it? If you like law and crime but also a good mystery and psychology shows, I highly recommend it. This is the last season, so you won’t be on hiatus like me for 5 years between seasons!)

Anyways, I went for a lookout on IMDB.

Now I’ve heard about Rick and Morty, as they have a huge fanbase, but I never actually thought about watching it. In my opinion, they were drawn poorly (I’m a big fan of anime so American style of drawing didn’t appeal to me much) and I thought they were just some cartoon about space and stuff.

Until now.

And was I in for a ride!

For those who don’t know, Rick and Morty is an AdultSwim animated series that follows the exploits of a super scientist and his not-so-bright grandson.

I swallowed the first three seasons in a week and now I’m back to watching them again. And since I started thinking about Rick Sanchez for days at a time, I thought why not write this character study. He’s interesting enough and I will probably discover even more by writing about him.

For this, I will purposefully omit the “original pilot” episode. You know, the one with… balls. Simply because that didn’t end up in the show, and the relationship between Rick and Morty is way different now than what it was in that pilot.

This will be written under the premise that we’re following the C-137 Rick, the “Rickest Rick”.

I’ve noticed that he often changes his dominant hand and upon googling it, I learned that there is a theory that we’re following multiple Ricks. But for the sake of simplicity, I will say that he’s ambidextrous (probably practiced to reach that level of using both hands).

I will include other characters around him, as they serve us great purpose in setting him properly. Also, I will mention some theories out there. So beware, there will be spoilers!

This analysis will be done by seasons and made into blog series, as in every season of Rick and Morty there is something new to learn on how to develop fictional characters.

Plus, cramping it all into one blog post will make it too long in my opinion.

So this is Season 1 of Rick and Morty, Rick Sanchez character study.

Rick Sanchez is clearly a dynamic character and a protagonist, as his stories and emotions develop through the seasons and we get to see more and more of his thoughts reflect on the surface.

Morty Smith could be classified as a dynamic character but a deuteragonist, as they both lead the story by switching their roles through the adventures.

To place them into perspective as the most complicated characters of the show, we have their family.

Beth Smith (nee Sanchez) could be classified as a static character. Her development does not undergo a significant change. She hates being called a “horse” surgeon, feels bad that Rick had left her mother and think whether or not she should leave Jerry.

Jerry Smith is a classic flat character. We know he got Beth pregnant, he’s a coward and he lost his job, but we don’t care to know more.

While Summer, their first kid, is actually a round character, and we will see her playing some big roles in later episodes.

Episode 1 – Pilot


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